Calgary Historical House Prices: Single Family, Apartments & Townhomes

Below is an update to the historical Calgary house prices post I did back in 2010.  The charts reflect the new statistics reporting (see footnote) for those that prefer to use it so you can have an apples-to-apples comparison going forward.

(Updated: December 2014) For the raw monthly figures going back 10 years, you can download the summary here 

I hope you find all the information useful and interesting.  I look forward to working with you in the future when you buy or sell real estate! 🙂

Note: New Statistics Reporting by CREB

As of February 6, 2012, in order to align CREB’s data with the MLS® Home Price Index (HPI) there have been several changes made to the data that CREB reports, as well as the upcoming monthly statistics package. Changes to the data were made to better reflect “Residential” sales. These changes not only provide a better residential picture, they are more consistent with how CREA and the HPI report our housing statistics.

Only includes sales by members in Zones A, B, C, D. Excludes following sales:

  • Vacant lots
  • Time shares
  • Parking stalls
  • Mobile homes

Condominiums have been separated into Condominium Apartments and Condominium Townhouse. Condominium Apartment – includes all “Condominium” title properties that are classified by type as either a low-rise or high-rise apartment. Condominium Townhouse – include all “condominium” titled properties that are not classified as an “Apartment”.

Single Family Homes

SFH: 10-year historical prices (click to enlarge)

SFH Year-over-Year price Change (click to enlarge image)

SFH – Index (click to enlarge image)

Condo: Apartments

Apartment Prices (click to enlarge image)

Apartment Year-Over-Year Price Changes (click to enlarge image)

Condo: Townhomes

Townhome Prices (click to enlarge image)

Townhome: Year-Over-Year Change

Townhome Year-Over-Year Change (click to enlarge image)

Townhome index

Townhome Index (click to enlarge image)

Note: New Statistics Reporting by CREB

As of February 6, 2012, in order to align CREB’s data with the MLS® Home Price Index (HPI) there have been several changes made to the data that CREB reports, as well as the upcoming monthly statistics package. Changes to the data were made to better reflect “Residential” sales. These changes not only provide a better residential picture, they are more consistent with how CREA and the HPI report our housing statistics.

Only includes sales by members in Zones A, B, C, D. Excludes following sales:

  • Vacant lots
  • Time shares
  • Parking stalls
  • Mobile homes

Condominiums have been separated into Condominium Apartments and Condominium Townhouse. Condominium Apartment – includes all “Condominium” title properties that are classified by type as either a low-rise or high-rise apartment. Condominium Townhouse – include all “condominium” titled properties that are not classified as an “Apartment”.

Mike Fotiou is an Associate Broker with First Place Realty and is registered as a Certified Condominium Specialist and Commissioner for Oaths in the Province of Alberta.   Whenever you’re ready to buy or sell real estate, please call 403-554-2284 or email at: mike@findcalgary.com

11 responses to “Calgary Historical House Prices: Single Family, Apartments & Townhomes

  1. Pingback: Calgary Historical Average House Prices & Sales Timeline | Calgary Real Estate Review

  2. Where is 1994 to 2002 did not want people to see the truth that in reality prices jumping 200 thousand in 3 years is not normal but instead is a bubble. Year over year since 1995 or 96 prices have jumped 50 to 80 thousand a year. When it’s never happened in history unless it’s the boom and bust of a bubble.

  3. Hi Clayton, do a little digging before making silly claims. Here are house prices going back to 70’s. Odd you didn’t see it, because you wrote nonsense on that post too 😉

  4. This coming from a realtor the cause of the problem. You need to stop living to people

  5. Show from 1995 to now. You won’t because your full of crap

  6. What ever it’s a boom bust bubble not matter what some chart you made at home. Facts would be good. Not lies

  7. I seen charts like these in elementary school. Your good with crayons

  8. Thank you for the information. Currently there is a great deal of panic assisted by media and other sources that is current and has an impact on all parties. This is not new in an area that still is impacted by Big Oil. A graph that is historical to the present day that tracks year over year single family home prices for a minimum of 50 years back would be very helpful if not a must. Alberta and Calgary often has a boom and bust mentality however a 10 year period is not a good enough indicator. Often trends come up and down but any consumer can feel comfort with a year over year average in growth that goes back decades, perhaps even 100 years. We ALL need the refocus and history often does not lie if we look carefully at the data and we DO NOT manipulate it for self serving ends. Again, Thank you. Please include this information if available. If not available, an important question must be asked and that is why not?


    For starters, there wasn’t a Calgary real estate board 100 years ago.
    -Mike Fotiou

  9. This is frustrating in that now all comparisons to previous years for these categories are much less useful. Coming at a time when there is significant flux and downturn in the market, this seems a disservice.

    Is it possible to get new data reported with the old categories still or are we stuck with the new rules Mike?


    The City of Calgary overall stats is little changed, so that’s good. For the 10-year historical of the new attached, detached and apartment categories: click here
    -Mike Fotiou

  10. Clayton, looking back 100 years would not be particularly useful. Much has changed in the past 100 years which would render any comparisons or analysis irrelevant. More relevant is that we consider the past 10 – 15 years data carefully and in context understanding what influences on the housing market have changed housing market conditions. So called “facts” must be considered in context or risk misinterpretation.

    Mike, keep up the good work.

  11. Mike, I really appreciate the data provided.

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